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Olympic Greek Euros

Author: Topic: Olympic Greek Euros
 Raffaele
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Posted: Nov 07, 2005 3:37:01 pm    
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Attachment: uploads/goldsilver.jpg

Athens 2004 - Olympic Games Coins
Starting from March 2003, the Bank of Greece will issue a series of six different coin series commemorating the Athens 2004 Olympic Games. The total collection will include 18 coins (6 Gold and 12 Silver) which will be released in 6 quarterly issues, each consisting of 1 Gold and 2 Silver coins. The themes have been selected by the Minister for the National Economy and the Governor of the Bank of Greece, from a set of proposals presented by a national technical and artistic committee. A special series comprising 2 gold and 4 silver coins has also been minted to commemoratwe the Olympic Torch Relay.

Series: A - B - C - D - E - F and Olympic Torch Relay
(You can download these series on the next week.)
COMMON SIDE: See attachment

Designs
The coins have been designed by the painter and engraver Panayiotis Gravalos, while the reliefs were created by the sculptor Kostas Kazakos, who, having worked for five years for the Greek Mint, has put his signature on several of the most beautiful Greek coins. One of these, the 50 drachma coin, was awarded first prize in a competition in Washington D.C., USA, in 1988 and is considered by many to be the most beautiful coin in the world. The Official Coins of the ATHENS 2004 Olympic Games are of unique value to coin collectors, since they will be limited in number of designs and mintage per coin, compared to previous Olympic coin collections.

The themes of the Gold coins have a civilization theme and portray prominent landmarks from the history of Greece. The Silver coins feature sporting themes and each design motif has been rendered using a modern depiction in the foreground contrasted with a clflourical depiction of the sport in the background. Thus the designs communicate the pflourage-through-time with the foreground modern depiction rendered in a crisp precise manner, while the clflourical backgrounds are rendered in such a way that they appear to be worn, much as a coin appears with the pflourage of time. The Olympic Flame series portrays themes from the Olympic Torch Relay.

All the best from Italy.

 Raffaele
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Posted: Nov 08, 2005 2:53:16 pm    
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Attachment: uploads/SeriesA.jpg
Series: A

Issue date: 3.3.2003
Description: The first series of Olympic coins was issued on March 3, 2003. The coins can be purchased individually, in sets of two silver coins and a complete set including all three coins, the gold and the two silver ones. The collection will be completed with 5 more series.

KM#: 192 - Gold Coin / 100 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: On the large island of Crete, first inhabited in the Neolithic era around 6000 B.C., a glorious culture developed that became known as the Minoan civilization (2600-1100 B.C.). The most glorious monument of this civilization was the Palace of Minos at Knossos, which is the subject of the first gold coin of the 2004 Olympics. It was the administrative and economic center, while at the same time it also had a sacred character. Beyond the architectural value of the palace, it is also noteworthy for its many well preserved interior wall paintings depicting social life in the Minoan period. The famous wall painting "Taurokatharpsia" (bull vaulting) is preserved in the interior of the Palace and it may be considered the precursor of the contests of the Clflourical and later periods. The contest of Taurokatharpsia involves executing a series of somersaults and dangerous acrobatics on the back of a running bull.

KM#: 191 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Disc throwing is one of the most "noble" sporting events, since it did not have any direct connection with military exercises or farm work. It has remained virtually unchanged in the 28 centuries of its history, bearing therefore a significant historical tradition. In antiquity it formed part of the pentathlon, and it required the athlete to bend his legs more, and not rotate his body as much as athletes do today. In the composition a modern athlete in the foreground is seen in a half-turned position, while an ancient discus thrower in the background has been captured in a lively bending motion, with the discus high above his head, creating a vivid representation of the sport.

KM#: 190 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Athletics has its roots in ancient Greek history. Today Greeks still refer to Athletic events as clflourical sports. Its first Olympic Games in 776 BC included a 192.2 m sprint known as the one stadium race (equivalent to today's 200m sprint). During the first 13 Olympiads between 776 and 728 B.C. it was in fact the only athletic event. In the composition a modern athlete figure appears in the foreground, shown in the starting position, while in the background two ancient runners are carved in such way as to give the appearance of a coin "worn" by time, a scene originally appearing on a black-figure vase of the 6th century B.C.

 Raffaele
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Posted: Nov 09, 2005 9:52:37 am    
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Attachment: uploads/SeriesB.jpg
Series: B

Issue date: 2.6.2003
Description: The second series of the Official Coins of the ATHENS 2004 Olympic Games was issued on June 2, 2003. The coins can be purchased individually, in sets of two silver coins and a complete set including all three coins, the gold and the two silver ones. The collection will be completed with 4 more series.

KM#: 195 - Gold Coin / 100 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: The enchanting setting of ancient Olympia was chosen by the ancient Greeks as the place where the most glorious and renowned pan-Hellenic games in antiquity were held, which gave birth to the modern Olympic Games. The entire area of Olympia is occupied by temples, altars, gymnasia and stadia, porticoes and guest houses, the treasuries of the various Greek cities and a great number of statues. The first games in Olympia are believed to have been held in 776 B.C., a date that thereafter constituted the basis for the calculation of time in antiquity. They were initially local games, which later became Peloponnesian and finally pan-Hellenic. Thus, they acquired an official character, since while in progress a military truce was declared and any hostilities between rival Greek cities ceased. One of the most important monuments of Olympia, pictured on the second Gold coin, is the Crypt, a long and narrow vaulted pflourage through which the athletes and judges entered the Stadium, and which soon acquired its symbolic importance signifying the opening of the games.

KM#: 194 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Long jump is also one of the clflourical track events, drawing its roots from ancient times. In antiquity only the long jump without momentum existed, where the athlete had to hold a jumpingweight in each hand, which he swung vigorously to help him achieve momentum, and then dropped behind him before landing. The men's long jump was on the programme of the Athens Olympic Games in 1896, and the women's on the programme of the 1948 Olympic Games in London. In its modern version it flourumes 4 forms (simple jump - triple jump - long jump - pole vault). The theme protrays a modern athlete at the moment he is touching the ground, while the ancient athlete in the backround is shown while starting off his jump, as he is seen on a black-figure vase of the 5th century B.C.

KM#: 193 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: The modern event continues an ancient tradition. The javelin was on the programme of the ancient Olympic Games as one of the pentathlon sports and took on two forms: a) throwing the javelin for distance and b) throwing the javelin at a target, in an event that may be likened to shooting today, and which was performed by athletes on foot or on horseback. The difference between the ancient and the modern javelin is the use in antiquity of a thong, a strap forming a loop and held by the athlete with his index and middle fingers. Today, the javelin is carried along a corridor 30 to 36.5 m long and 4 m wide, at the end of which there is an arc-shaped line to define the throwing line. The event was introduced at the 1908 Olympic Games in London, and Los Angeles Olympic Games of 1932, for men and women respectively. In the composition a modern athlete figure appears in the foreground, running towards the starting point of the throw, and an ancient athlete in the position of preparation for the throw, as he is depicted on a 5th century representation.

 Raffaele
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Posted: Nov 10, 2005 12:58:10 pm    
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Attachment: uploads/SeriesC.jpg
Series: C

Issue date: 1.9.2003
Description: The third series of the Official Coins of the ATHENS 2004 Olympic Games was issued on September 1, 2003. The coins can be purchased individually, in sets of two silver coins and a complete set including all three coins, the gold and the two silver ones. The collection will be completed with 3 more series.

KM#: 198 - Gold Coin / 100 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: The Panathenean stadium is a beautiful marble stadium (Kallimarmaron) located on the Ardettos hill in Athens, where once stood the ancient stadium which is believed to have been built around 330 B.C and was used for the Panathinean games. In 1896, when the first Olympic Games of the modern era were to be held, it was proposed to the Greek public benefactor George Averof that he undertake the expenses for the restoration of the stadium and its fitting with new marble seats, a task which he willingly undertook. Architect Anastasios Metaxas was placed in charge of the works, and the inauguration of the stadium was celebrated on March 25 1896, (Greece's national day), together with the opening of the first Olympic Games of modern times.

KM#: 197 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Equestrian or Horse Riding is a noble sport of great tradition, always reminding us of the unbreakable relation between human beings and horses. Since prehistoric times, people have been riding horses and two Equestrian events, chariot races and horses races, were first included in the 25th ancient Olympic Games competition schedule, in 680 BC. Equestrian events developed primary from training horses for war and many reports point to the fact that ancient Greeks used exercises similar to the modern Dressage events, in order to train their horses to move accurately and precisely in the battlefields. Many Olympic coins were struck in antiquity on the occasion of victories in equestrian events. On this composition of the coin, the modern horseman is pictured as he jumps over an obstacle, while in the background the ancient horseman is inspired by a representation on a black-figure vase of the 5th century B.C.

KM#: 196 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Relay races can be traced to the ancient custom of sending messages via a series of couriers (skytalodromoi or "runners with a message stick"). Each courier handed the stick over to the next until its destination was safely reached. At present the relay race has completely changed character and has become an important official sport of the Olympic Games. In the relay race there are four runners from each country. Each runner covers a quarter of the distance, called a leg, then pfloures a rigid hollow tube called a baton to the succeeding team member. Changeovers must be accomplished within a zone extending 18 m (20 yd) at the beginning of each baton exchange. In the composition three modern athletes run, holding their batons while in the background three ancient athletes are shown running a race known as the dolichos (a semi-endurance race of approximately 3,800 meters distance).

 Raffaele
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Posted: Nov 13, 2005 10:21:20 am    
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Attachment: uploads/SeriesD.jpg
Series: D

Issue date: 3.11.2003
Description: The forth series of the Official Coins of the ATHENS 2004 Olympic Games was issued on November 3, 2003. The coins can be purchased individually, in sets of two silver coins and a complete set including all three coins, the gold and the two silver ones. The collection will be completed with 2 more series.

KM#: 201 - Gold Coin / 100 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Zappeion is an Athenian mansion built at the expense of the Greek public benefactor Evangelos Zappas (1800 - 1865) to serve as the venue for Greek artistic, agricultural and industrial fairs. Harilaos Trikoupis later (1887) decided to move elsewhere the Protestant cemetery that was situated there and to create a garden around the building. The Zappeion, designed by the architect Theophilos Hansen, was built between 1874 and 1888. It was originally given the name 'Olympia' and acquired its present name after the death of the two brothers Evangelos and Konstantinos Zappas, whose busts - created by the well-known Greek sculptors I. Kossos and G. Vroutos respectively - stand at the entrance of the building. Zappeion, which is the subject of the fourth gold coin, is related to the first Olympic Games in Athens in 1896, since at that time, the lack of a necessary infrastructure and the accommondation facilities for the participants, required the use of the mansion as an "Olympic village" for the Games and also to host certain games, such as fencing.

KM#: 200 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Swimming was highly esteemed in ancient Greece and Rome, as shown on vases and wall paintings dating back to 1,600 B.C., especially as a form of training for warriors. In modern times competitive swimming was instituted in Great Britain at the end of the 18th century and the first modern Olympic Games, held in Athens, Greece, in 1896, included swimming races. On the coin a woman swimmer is depicted, preparing to dive from the diving-board, while in the background another woman athlete is just about to dive into the water, a scene from an Archaic bronze statuette.

KM#: 199 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Rhythmic Gymnastics is one of the oldest sports in the world. In ancient Greece, three distinct programmes of gymnastic exercise were developed: one for the maintenance of good physical condition, another for military training, and a third as part of the conditioning regimen for athletes. Modern rhythmic gymnastics were developed in the late 1950s. In this sport for females only, disciplines are characterized by the use of accessories such as a ball, clubs, hoop and rope, and ribbons, to the accompaniment of music. The composition on the coin represents a young woman holding a multicoloured ribbon, executing a graceful figure, while in the background, two female athletes from antiquity execute a series of acrobatic figures, the scene was taken from a terracotta in Lower Italy.

 Raffaele
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Posted: Nov 30, 2005 4:01:30 pm    
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Attachment: uploads/SeriesE.jpg
Series: E

Issue date: 1.4.2004
Description: The fifth series of the Official Coins of the ATHENS 2004 Olympic Games was issued on March 1, 2004. The coins can be purchased individually, in sets of two silver coins and a complete set including all three coins, the gold and the two silver ones. The collection will be completed with 1 more series.

KM#: 204 - Gold Coin / 100 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: The Acropolis of Athens, is one of the most glorious creations of humankind. It was constructed between 447 and 432 bc and was originally painted in vivid reds and blues, but the marble pillars gradually lost their paint and faded to white. It encompfloures a remarkable collection of ancient Greek monuments, including the Parthenon, the Erechtheum, the Propylaea, the Temple of Athena Nike, and others. The Acropolis represents all the periods of the city that lies at its feet, since all the historical events of Athens unfolded and centred around this low rock. It is also directly relevant to athletic events since during the festival of the Panathenaea a torch race took place at night, starting from the altar of Prometheus in the Academy and ending before the altar of Athena on the top of the rock.

KM#: 203 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Wrestling has been popular throughout recorded history. Early Egyptian and Babylonian reliefs depict wrestlers using most of the holds known to the modern sport. In ancient Greece, wrestling occupied a prominent place in legend and literature; wrestling competition, brutal in many aspects, was the supreme contest of the Olympian Games. On the coin, a modern athlete applies a waist-hold on his opponent and prepares to twist him round and throw him down to the ground, while in the background two ancient athletes are pictured in the stance known as akrocheirismos (finger-hold) and are pushing their heads against each other. This representation has been taken from a black-figure vase.

KM#: 202 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Weightlifting is a sport based on the lifting of a series of progressively heavier metal weights. It is popular internationally, notably in the United States, the countries of the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), Germany, Bulgaria, Romania, Poland, Finland, Greece, Turkey, and Cuba. On the coin, a weightlifter executes a snatch move (arase): he is standing and holding the weights above his head, while the ancient athlete in the background is attempting to lift two natural stones, in a portrayal inspired by that on a black-figure vase of the 6th-5th century B.C.

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Posted: Nov 30, 2005 4:03:49 pm    
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Attachment: uploads/SeriesF.jpg
Series: F

Issue date: 31.5.2004
Description: The sixth and final series of the Official Coins of the ATHENS 2004 Olympic Games was issued on May 31, 2004. The coins can be purchased individually, in sets of two silver coins and a complete set including all three coins, the gold and the two silver ones.

KM#: 207 - Gold Coin / 100 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: The Academy was the foremost intellectual institution of modern Greece, its mission being to promote the Arts and Sciences. The first discussions regarding its establishment took place during the meeting of the National flourembly at Argos (1826). The building, designed by the Danish architect Theophilos Hansen, began construction in 1859 on a site ceded by the Petraki Monastery and the municipality of Athens, with funds offered for the purpose by the Greek public benefactor, Baron Simon Sinas, which is why it is also known as the 'Sinaea Academia'. The Academy began to operate in 1926, and is constituted by three departments, Exact Sciences, Fine Arts Letters and the Moral and Political Sciences. The Academy is the subject of the sixth gold Olympic coin. The intention here, is to highlight the premise that in the city of Athena, the Olympic Games should not only be the most important athletic event, but also to be accompanied by intellectual and cultural activities, equivalent to the style and character of the city that was the birthplace and the matrix for the revival of the modern Olympic Games of 1896.

KM#: 206 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Football games are common in many parts of the world even in ancient times. Some 2,500 years ago the Chinese played a form of it called Tsu chu, in which they kicked a ball of stuffed leather. Natives of Polynesia are known to have played a variation of the game with a ball made of bamboo fibres, while the Inuit had another form using a leather ball filled with moss. In most cases, the ball was a symbol for the sun and "conquering" it would ensure fertility and a good crop. The design of this coin represents a modern football player ready to hit the ball, his ancient counterpart demonstrates his technique by bouncing a ball on his thigh, his hands tied behind his back. The representation was taken from a 4 century b.C. marble relief.

KM#: 205 - Silver Coin / 10 Euros (See Attachment)
Description: Handball is one of the world's oldest sports and many civilizations and nations claim its origins as their own. Even Homer in the Odyssey describes the game which was introduced at the Berlin Olympic Games in 1936 as an 11-a-side outdoor game. On the coin, the modern athlete directs the ball in his hands towards his target, while in the background the ancient athlete is just about to throw a ball, in a game known as cheirosphaira, in a representation taken from a black figure vase of the Archaic period.

 thanu
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Posted: Sep 27, 2010 7:35:17 am    
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Greece is the epicentre of the Euro problem, and it really isn't a problem with the Euro itself, but a problem with the Greek National Debt, some of which likely still originates with the Athens Olympics in 2004.
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Joe Hachem

 emily08
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Posted: Jan 08, 2011 12:59:35 pm    
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Many collectors attempt to obtain one coin from as many different countries as possible, including coins from countries that no longer exist, countries that have just formed, others that around for while but have undergone name changes, breakaway republics, and so on. Other collectors try to obtain as many different coins from same country as possible, but this approach can challenge if they choose country that has issued coins over several centuries.


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 A script written by Tim Hoeppner Version: 1.95Mantained by Raffaele Russo 2002 - 2005 

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